7:29 pm - Sun, Sep 14, 2014
333 notes

(Source: adoringbayley, via ragnabrock)

7:22 pm
84,050 notes

timothydelaghetto:

mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

Female BAMFs Throughout History

WOW!

It would be way cooler if we could remember these women by name, and not just what they did, y’know?

(via jerseydrag)

7:16 pm
40,705 notes

bro-boner:

It’s days like this that I like to remember that the Irish government are ever proud of the Spire of Dublin.

image

It’s literally a 400 ft metal spike sticking out of the ground. It was supposed to be done for the new millennium but they didn’t start building it until 2002.

And it’s supposed to be self-cleaning but it doesn’t work and there’s no way to clean it.

Ireland.

"Spireland" is right there tho…

(via ragnabrock)

2:40 am
55,478 notes
I think that a huge problem is people who read comics and don’t understand the point of superheroes, which is to be the best version of yourself. You love Captain America? Well, you know what Captain America would never do? Go online anonymously and shit on a girl for having an opinion.
Brian Michael Bendis, dropping truth bombs in an interview with Vulture (via brynnasaurus)

(via cynthiavondooms)

2:33 am
4,180 notes

"Best shop in Brighton" Nick Cave RT @artrepublic: @nickcave just popped in & chose this print

"Best shop in Brighton" Nick Cave RT : just popped in & chose this print

(via plasticbats)

1:28 am
264 notes

(Source: justiceforlotus, via gsbrandon)

3:37 am - Sat, Sep 13, 2014
410 notes
12:48 am
18 notes

gsbrandon:

Today we’ll talk a bit about the tag team gauntlet, sizes, and a couple of championship facts.

- Every King of Trios has held a tag gauntlet on Night 3. The first tag gauntlet contained seventeen teams (!) and lasted 51 minutes. Every year since then has typically carried about…

12:40 am
15 notes
12:39 am
242 notes

LOVEEEEE

(Source: purogifs, via twentypercentcooler)

5:18 am - Fri, Sep 12, 2014
56,297 notes
5:16 am
10,191 notes
gailsimone:


the preeminent gail simone of our time


Still a huge problem.

gailsimone:

the preeminent gail simone of our time

Still a huge problem.

(Source: dee-lirious, via iamhayleyjane)

5:00 am
38 notes

hurdhatfieldluv:

Lifelong friends, Hurd Hatfield and Angela Lansbury through the years on the screen :)

(via fuckyeahjbfletcher)

5:27 pm - Thu, Sep 11, 2014
4 notes

Immediately after the Gunner/Brittany meeting, we get Tazz on commentary insisting that chicks love whackjobs. This is a problem. It’s not just that it bolsters the idea that nice guys can’t get girls because the crazy bad-boy types shove all of them into the friendzone or whatever. The problem is that it completely normalizes what happened between Christy Hemme and Samuel Shaw. And then it’s all downhill from there.
I have a problem with the very common mindset that the crowd dictates whether or not someone is a face or heel by cheering for the good guys and booing the bad guys. When you’re actively putting out the idea that doing bad things is good, is it really the crowd’s fault when they cheer? To wit, look at two fairly recent instances in Ring of Honor: When Cheeseburger was stalking Maria, he did the same thing Crazzy Steve does to Velvet Sky – grabs her and kisses her against her will. Mike Bennett therefore becomes the bad guy for defending Maria, and going after Cheeseburger. When Romantic Touch was stalking Veda Scott, there was one RD Evans match where he chased her until they disappeared under the ring for a few minutes. She crawled out frantic and disheveled, he crawled out after her and lit up a cigarette. The implication is that he sexually assaulted her under the ring, or at the very least got off on her without her consent (still sexual assault btw). She is the bad guy. He is cheered by the crowd and praised on commentary.
Look at a more recent example: Dolph Ziggler stealing the “private photographs” of the Miz on the most recent episode of WWE Raw. Instead of people being like yo, why are you stealing from people that’s creepy and wrong, he was cheered for using coded language and making thinly veiled gay jokes at Miz and Sandow. Why is anyone cheering for any of this?
These are the confrontations wrestling desperately needs to have in order to move forward and progress and leave behind it’s prehistoric mindset. When someone makes fun of a wrestler or commentator for wearing pink or sparkles, ask why that’s an insult. Question why a heel wears pink until Breast Cancer Awareness month. Question why “it takes a tough guy to wear” whatever EC3 is wearing. Question why stalking and sexual assault are for the good guys, and defending against it is for bad guys. Question why we’re told that these are the things you need to do to be praised and cheered and liked by your peers. Don’t keep playing along with institutionalized misogyny and homophobia, then have the only question you ask be “why don’t people respect me for watching wrestling?”

- The Best And Worst Of Impact 9/10/14

Immediately after the Gunner/Brittany meeting, we get Tazz on commentary insisting that chicks love whackjobs. This is a problem. It’s not just that it bolsters the idea that nice guys can’t get girls because the crazy bad-boy types shove all of them into the friendzone or whatever. The problem is that it completely normalizes what happened between Christy Hemme and Samuel Shaw. And then it’s all downhill from there.

I have a problem with the very common mindset that the crowd dictates whether or not someone is a face or heel by cheering for the good guys and booing the bad guys. When you’re actively putting out the idea that doing bad things is good, is it really the crowd’s fault when they cheer? To wit, look at two fairly recent instances in Ring of Honor: When Cheeseburger was stalking Maria, he did the same thing Crazzy Steve does to Velvet Sky – grabs her and kisses her against her will. Mike Bennett therefore becomes the bad guy for defending Maria, and going after Cheeseburger. When Romantic Touch was stalking Veda Scott, there was one RD Evans match where he chased her until they disappeared under the ring for a few minutes. She crawled out frantic and disheveled, he crawled out after her and lit up a cigarette. The implication is that he sexually assaulted her under the ring, or at the very least got off on her without her consent (still sexual assault btw). She is the bad guy. He is cheered by the crowd and praised on commentary.

Look at a more recent example: Dolph Ziggler stealing the “private photographs” of the Miz on the most recent episode of WWE Raw. Instead of people being like yo, why are you stealing from people that’s creepy and wrong, he was cheered for using coded language and making thinly veiled gay jokes at Miz and Sandow. Why is anyone cheering for any of this?

These are the confrontations wrestling desperately needs to have in order to move forward and progress and leave behind it’s prehistoric mindset. When someone makes fun of a wrestler or commentator for wearing pink or sparkles, ask why that’s an insult. Question why a heel wears pink until Breast Cancer Awareness month. Question why “it takes a tough guy to wear” whatever EC3 is wearing. Question why stalking and sexual assault are for the good guys, and defending against it is for bad guys. Question why we’re told that these are the things you need to do to be praised and cheered and liked by your peers. Don’t keep playing along with institutionalized misogyny and homophobia, then have the only question you ask be “why don’t people respect me for watching wrestling?”

The Best And Worst Of Impact 9/10/14

1:31 am
41,622 notes
These are forms of male aggression that only women see. But even when men are afforded a front seat to harassment, they don’t always have the correct vantage point for recognizing the subtlety of its operation. Four years before the murders, I was sitting in a bar in Washington, D.C. with a male friend. Another young woman was alone at the bar when an older man scooted next to her. He was aggressive, wasted, and sitting too close, but she smiled curtly at his ramblings and laughed softly at his jokes as she patiently downed her drink. ‘Why is she humoring him?’ my friend asked me. ‘You would never do that.’ I was too embarrassed to say: ‘Because he looks scary’ and ‘I do it all the time.’

Women who have experienced this can recognize that placating these men is a rational choice, a form of self-defense to protect against setting off an aggressor. But to male bystanders, it often looks like a warm welcome, and that helps to shift blame in the public eye from the harasser and onto his target, who’s failed to respond with the type of masculine bravado that men more easily recognize.

Why it’s so hard for men to see misogyny (via vulturechow)

this quote was immediately preceded by this

Among men, misogyny hides in plain sight, and not just because most men are oblivious to the problem or callous toward its impact. Men who objectify and threaten women often strategically obscure their actions from other men, taking care to harass women when other men aren’t around.

which is probably the more important point

(via stayinbedgrowyrhair)

(Source: ethiopienne, via iamhayleyjane)

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